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WHIT J. ELLIS 
The Editor 

S. L. HARGROVE 

Sponsor 



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THE CLAW 

1927 



Published by the 

SENIOR and JUNIOR CLASSES 

of the 
Colored Agricultural and Normal University 

Langsfon ... Oklahoma 



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DEDICATION 



The crowning feature of a publication of this nature is 
its dedication. The Editors, bearing this in mind, employed 
their best thought in its selection. However, no difficulty 
was realized iti this effort and the Staff was unanimous 
in its selection of our President — Dr. I. \Y. Young, A. M. 
M. 1). 

To you, we delicate this publication with all sincerity 
and appreciation for your fatherly care of each and every 
one of us, for your Christian guidance and untiring effort 
to lead us in the right paths of life, for your many, many 
accomplishments since taking over the reins of the Uni- 
versity which is dear to us all, for your spirit and interest 
that extend to the field of every Alumni, be that field and 
worker ever so humble. With no apology, we dedicate this 
book to you. 



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PRESIDENT I. W. YOUNG, A. M. 



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I 

A FOREWORD 
8 
a 

I 

We admit that the responsibility for the publication of 
a 

the 1927 Claw is accepted and prosecuted by us with some 

Q 

degree of apprehension, but that high pleasure that must 
be present in the hearts of servants is much in evidence. 
I 

a 

Many things of merit will be over looked, we must agree, 

according to the imperfection of the human mind. But 

our observations are sufficiently impressed by the activi- 
ty 

ties and accomplishments of the student-body to give a 
a 

record that will be the pride of the student-body, alumni, 

and friends of the University. We fully realize the im- 
portance of a record and do hereby attempt to bestow the 



same with that degree of modesty and sanctity that must 
accompany every effort of this nature. 



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CONTENTS 



THE CAMPUS 

COLLEGE CLAIMS 

SECONDARY EDUCATION CLASSES 

ACTIVITIES 

ATHLETICS 

ALUMNI 

NECROLOGY 

ADVERTISEMENTS 



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ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 



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PHYLLIS WHEATLEY HALL 



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MARQUESS HALL 



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—-THE CLAW 



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OFFICERS AND ADMINISTRATION 



a 

H Honorable Henry S. Johnston, Governor 

John Yaughan, State Superintendent 

I 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

y M. A. Nash, Chairman 

a 

E. A. Duke, Secretary 

E. M. Castleberry 

Q 

g Ned Holman 

8 

X Neil Humphrey 

Q ADMINISTRATION 

9 

I. W. Young, President 



S. L. Hargrove, Yioe-President 



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PRESIDENT, I. W. YOUNG 



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S. L. HARGROVE, 
"Vice President and Dean 



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Faculty 





J. w. 



PETTUS, A. M. 

Extension 



MRS. P. P. EDGAR, 
Commerce 



J. E. TAYLOR. B. S. 
District Agent 




Wm. H. BELL, A. 

Social Science 



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DEAN S. L. HARGROVE, A. B. 
College 



P. L. MEGGS, A. B. 
Prin. H. S. 



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Faculty 





W. H. McCANE, JR., 
Mathematics 



H. J. HENDRICKS, 
Auto Mechanics 



E. J. BROWN. 
Art 




B. N. MATHTS, 
Animal Husbandry 



ELLA P. BAKER 
Dean of Women 



J. S. THOMAS, 

Shoe Repairing- 



B. C. EASTER, 
History 



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Faculty 




B. P. LEE, A. M. 
Mathematics 



G. S. RICKS, H. E. 
Home Economies 



W. J. STARKS, A. M. 
History 




MRS. 



M. WEAVER, 
Printing 



A. B. 



W. 



A. EASTER, A. B. 
Education 



S. W. HUGHEY, 
Music 



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Faculty 







P. M. JONES 
Band and Orchestra 



LEROY G. MOORE, 
Director of Science 



EMMA BACKSTROM, 
Matron 



Clerical Family 






H. L. HOLMES, 
Sec'y. to Pres. 



EULA A. TILLRY, 
Registrar 



ADLISSIE C. McNAIR 
Sec'y. of Extension 



M. 



W. MEEKS, 
Commerce 



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seniors 



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F. K. JONES, "Crow" 

Agriculture 

Spartans Club, Chorus, Mgr 

Voice, Sec'y. Class 



N. R. SHARP, "Partner" 

Education 

President of Class '27, Pres. 

Spartans, Honorary Delta, 

Football Letter, Basket Ball, 

Y. M. C. A. 



JOSEPH L. TROTTER, 

"Trot" 

Education 

Treas. of Class 

Valedictorian 

Y. M. C. A. 



FERGUSON BROOKS, 

"Ferg" 
Education 

Band 

Orchestra 

Delta Gamma Alpha 

Chorus 

Class Orator 



J. H. SPENCER, "Jache" 

Education 

Major Cadet Corps., Chorus, 

Voice, Finance, Reserve Lieut. 

U. S. Army 



THOMAS P. SCOTT 

A. B. "Funis" 

Liberal Arts 

University Voice 

Y. M. C. A. 

Secretary Spartans 

Pres. L terary Society 

Class Poet 

Football 



M. L. SMITH, "Bugs" 

Agriculture 
Delta Gamma Alpha, Foot- 
ball Letter, Y. M. C. A. 



T. R. WHARTON, "Ted" 

Education 
Y. M. C. A., Football, Chorus, 
Glee Club, Quartette, Spar- 
tans Club 



CHARLES COLLINGS, 

"Colling" 

Agriculture 

Football Letter 

Y. M. C. A. 

Aggies Club 



WHIT J. ELLIS, 



'Red" 



Science 

Voice, Sports, Spartans Club, 

Claw 



twenty-six 



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OL.ASS OF 1927 



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Members of Senior Class of Junior College 



Solottie Sharp Edith Thompson 

Vassie Harvey S. M. Johnson 



q Corrine Giles Abbie Gray 

Hattie May Mattie Jackson 

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Geneva Chatman Emma Green Alcenia Holmes 



twenty-eight 



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SENIORS OF JUNIOR COLLEGE 



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Members of the Senior Class of Junior College 



Amberlean Brown 

Fa vie Lee Jackson 



MURDAS BRISTEIt 
MATTIE MoORE 



Peggie Brown 



R. L. Hudson 



Erlene Gray 
()ra Wyatt 



Daisy Lollis Nancy Lee 

Irene Tipton Marcella Simmons 



Lillie Mae Cooksey 



Mary Glass 



thirty 



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SENIORS OF JUNIOR COLLEGE 



thirty-one 



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THE CLAW * 

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C/crss History 1927 

It was September 15, in the year 1923 that a group of young men embarked 
upon a journey in search of a degree, in search of a wider view of life, 
-and in search for a better understanding of human wants and how to fill 
them. In this group were: Frank Jones, Estey Moore, Maeeo Smith, Fergu- 
son Brooks, John Spencer, Charles Collins, Arthur Peel, Thomas Scott, T. R. 
Wharton, Fentress Davis, Homer Jones, J. L. Trotter, and Norman Sharp. 
That first year was filled with work and more work. Indeed it seemed as 
if all of the teachers and instructors had entered into a league, having for 
their motto: "Freshmen, you shall not pass." We stuck to our task daily, 
determined to find our goal, and after nine months of streneous labor, we de- 
clared a truce. Thus ended the first year. 

The same group met again in September, 1924, for the purpose of pursuing 
that degree. We were wise, we were Sophomores. We had been christ- 
ened and were ready for battle. We thought that we kneAV how to handle 
the situation. To be frank, we thought we knew everything. How sad. As 
soon as we began again, the professors again entered into a compact. Their 
motto this time was, "Sophomores, you are only wise fools." Again they 
began to vent their fussy situations. We were tried in the fire of discipline 
and, had it not been for the timely arrival of one who acted as a soothing lo- 
tion for our tempered class, I feel that we would have been undone. Sweet 
reminiscence of loving character, a gentle little sister, a mocking bird in the 
person of Miss Katy Maw Perry, who joined us this time. With her kind help, 
we expanded our manly chests, then backed our shoulders and went forth and 
conquered a second time. 

September 1925 found our group increasing. We were James Rouce, Luther 
Harris, and Isiac Raimey. We lost our queen. We were determined to march 
to the goal of success. At this time we were Juniors and knew that we did 
not know everything. All the i adiealkm had been taken out of us. We ap- 
proached everything with care and conservatism. In fact, we were first learn- 
ing what it was all about. The way was not always clear, the task did not 
seem clear, nor were we laboring under favorable conditions at all times, but 
our mottor was "Onward". We chose no alternative limit to go forward. Nine 
months more of constructive work, and we declared a vacation. 
September 1926, we again met, but found our nunlber had decreased. We 
have with us in the home stretch, Charles Collins, Furguson Brooks, J. Hen- 
ry Spencer, T. Phurus Scott, T. Roosevelt Wharton, AA^hit J. Ellis, Jr., J. Leroy 
Trotter, Maceo L. Smith, Frank K. Jones, and N. Randolph Sharp. We called 
ourselves Seniors this time and think that we know something. 
This year is not so hard as the days of old that have gone by, for we know bet- 
ter how to cooperate, concentrate and blend our efforts for better results. 
And now we come to the end. Looking back, we see many pitfalls that we 
have avoided, only by the guidance of the administration and divine provi- 
dence. 

We feel grateful to the president of the University for tolerating our weak- 
ness and short comings. We are also grateful to the professors under whose 
hands we worked. Your reward is forth coming for the class of '27 shall 
make history that is worth while in time to come. 

thirty-two 



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Commencement Program 



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I 

I. Commencement Processional — 

H Processional March 

II. Song— "Negro National Anthem" Johnson 

Q Choral Club and Audience 

III. Invocation Rev. E. W. McGrew 

C IV. Spiritual— "Listen to the Lambs" Dett 

Choral Club 

V. Oration (Salutatory)— "Activities of the Subconscious Mind" 

J. H. Spencer 

VI. Song— "Oh! Come Fair Maid" Brown 

Boys' Glee Club 

VII. Oration (Agricultural) "New Viewpoints in Scientific Agriculture" 

Frank Jones 

VIII. Chorus— "Give Me My Native Isle" White 

S. Choral Club 

IX. Oration (Valedictory) Education the Hope of Civilization 

V J. LeRoy Trotter 

X. Song— "Creole Love Song" : Smith 

Girls' Glee Club 

XL Commencement Address Rev. H. T. S. Johnson, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

9 

a 

O The Choral Club 

9, 

U 



XII. Spiritual— "He Is The Lilly of the Valley" 



XIII. Conferring of Degrees President Young 

XIV. Doxology— 

XV. Orchestra— 



XVI. Honor Announcement — 

Magna Cum Laude — J. LeRoy Trotter John Henry Spenser 

Cum Laude — Frank Jones, T. P. Scott, N. R. Sharp, Maceo Smith. 
Distinction in Scholarship and Conduct leading- to Certificate in the College 
of Education. 
Mattye Jackson Bertha McKeever 

Amberlean Brown Opaline Carter 

The Degree of Bachelor of Science in Education is conferred upon the fol- 

$ lowing students: J. L. Trotter, Ferguson Brooks, N. R. Sharp, J. H. 

Spencer, T. R. Wharton. 

The Degree of Baehelor of Arts is conferred upon the following student: 

7j T. Phurus Scott. 

The Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture is conferred upon the fol- 
U lowing students: Charles Collins, Frank Jones, Maceo Smith. 

The Degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon the following stud- 
g ent: Whit J. Ellis, Jr. 

fl XVII. The Conferring of Degrees, President Isaac William Young A. M. M. D 

2 The Candidates for degrees will be presented by Directors of Departments 

y in the following order: 

tl Bachelor of Arts — Dean S. L. Hargrove A. B. 

Bachelor of Science in Education — Prof. W. A. Easter A. B. 
¥ Bachelor of Science in Agriculture — Prof. Wm. T. Wells, B. S. A. 

A 

n thirty-three 







V -~~ 1927 -~— ~~ — ,v^^ u 

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2 We're the class of twenty seven £j 

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The class the world shall hail armed for the cause 

Of our dear school o'er the sea of life we'll sail. 

Perched on the hill of much progress, called to the ft 



H cares of life, 

tl *' 

Shielded neath the old L. U. Fortress, 



We'll rise through fear or strife. A 

9 (2 * 

We face the world to-day, one force to seize life's cares U 

by storm, ** 

tl Ti 

We know no earthly face shall dare to check our spir- 

§ ited goal, o 

8 « 

We stand with ready hands to serve, to help thy 

5 needed call bowed at the throne of dear L. U. tl 

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9 We'll conquer, die or fall. 



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8 




Juniors 



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JONATHAN JOHNSON 
Brooksville 



M 



. C. FOX 

Tatums 



REUBEN JONES 



Langston 



JOHN TAYLOR WILLIAMS 



Muskogee 



JAMES MORRIS 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



MAURICE JONES 



Muskogee 



thirty-six 



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LUELLA HARRIS, 

El Reno 
Choral Club— 1926 

Glee Club— 1926 

Literati Club — 1926 

Normal Course 



MAYME CROWELL, 

Perry 

Normal Course 



AMANDA HARRIS, 
Oklahoma City 
Normal Course 



ELLA REE STEELE, 

Houston, Texas 

Literati Club— 1926 

Normal Course 



MRS. RITA MINGO, Chandler 
Normal Course 



JAMES B. WILSON, 

Chandler 

Hyperion Club— 1926 

Normal Course 



CHRISTINE OWENS, 

Boley 

Choral Club— 1926 

Literati Club — 1926 

Normal Course 



ODESSA PARKER, Porter 

Philomathean Club — 1926 

Normal Course 



VIRGIE BRITT, El Reno 
Normal Course 



WILLA GREEN, Porter 

Philomathean Club — 1926 

Choral Club— 1926 

Glee Club— 1926 

Oratorical Contest — 1926 

Normal Course 



GUTHRIE WICKLIFF, 

Vinita 

Normal Course 



MARCENA HUMPHRY 
Basketball— 1926 
Normal Course 



REGINA DECK, Lima 

Religious Editor for Claw 

Secretary to "Y. W." 

Normal Course 



ZELDAR MILLER 

Oklahoma City 

Basketball— 1926 

Literati Club— 1925-26 

Normal Course 



INEZ YOUNG 
Normal Course 



ODESSA HUTTON, Boynton 
Normal Course 



thirty-seven 



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non«oz*BO:ZF«Hon*nc>n*Hon*noi 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIOR CLASS 



In September, 1924, nine healthy, robust stalwart, green Freshman entered the gates 
of Langston University. Namely, Willie Kelly, Elmo Johnson, Joe Johnson, Reuben 
Jones, R. Maurience Jones, Otis Rogers, Foraker Tillman, James B. Morris and Tyree 
Young. 

These lived up to the title of "Green Fools" to prefection. Each had come from a 
different community and of course his chief ambition was to attempt to instill withir. 
his fellow students his wily ideas. When these attempts failed these young men dis- 
covered that, after all, their embryonic thinking powers could be thrown into the mid- 
dle of the Atlantic Ocean and yet the world would roll on. 

Nothing of importance was accomplished this year except that the spirit of Lang- 
ston University was instilled within their very bones. 

When the doors of the University swung open September. 1925, there were four 
new names added to The roster: John T. Williams, Luther Powell, William Elliott and 
Jessie Lucas. 

This year found The Class eager to enter into all activities that took place within 
the walls of the Campus. To begin the year right, the Freshman Class was corraled 
and each member crowned with a green cap. Although this class outnumbered the 
Sophomores, three to one, they were kept under complete control. 

Such a great increase in the number of students in the Freshman College Class was 
evidence in itself that the school spirit must rise to greater heights. 

When the football season was well under way, four players on the varsity eleven 
came from the Sophomore Class. Captain John Williams, Assistant Captain, Joe John- 
son, James (Bear) Morris and Mauriece (four-one) Jones. The class also furnished four 
promising scrubs: William (Sackey) Elliott, Elmo (Aesop) Johnson, -Foraker (Spark 
Plug) Tillman and Luther (Slick) Powell. By the close of the season, Captain John 
Williams was unanimously chosen All-American, and Assistant Captain Joe Johnson 
had been selected as half back on the second mythical eleven and Mauriece Jones re- 
ceived honorable mention as a half back. 

After a great football success, we entered into Basketball with full force. The "Varsity 
squad contained four members from the Sophomore Class. Namely: Captain Jones, 
Morris (forward) John T. Williams, (center) Mauriece (four-One) Jones, (guard) and 
Elmo (Aesop) Johnson (forward.) 

The Baseball season of 1926 had five players from this class: J. Williams, J. John- 
son, E. Johnson, Morris and Powell. 

The class won first place and $25.00 in the interclass oratorical contest. Mauriece 
Jones being the victor. 

The Junior year came in with a bang and with it came Julius Hill, Lelia Dean, Wil- 
liam Fox and Wilbur Gee. This increase brought the number to fifteen. 

Again the class excelled in Football, Basketball, Oratory and Scholarship as no other 
class had done that had gone before it. 



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Sophomore 



«c«»B<a»fiK>n»fifonftnC'a^non»:noaKsca»! 



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— 1927 

no ■ ^^^ :*aon*no 






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:oB<«Boa*a 



KERMIT ANDERSON 

Muskogee 

Football— 1925-26 

Basketball— 1925-26 

Spartan Club 

Science Course 



GLADYS PETTUS, 

Fort Smith, Ark. 

Philomathean Club— 1925-26 

Choral Club— 1926 

Glee Club— 1926 
Gymnasium Course 



WILLIAM LAWSON 

Houston, Tex. 
Spartan Club— 1926 
Aggie-Mechanical Club- 
Agricultural Course 



CHARLOTTE L. BRYANT, 

Evanston, Illinois 

Aggie-Mechanical Club 

—1925-26 

Choral Club— 1925-26 

Glee Club— 1926 

Secretary of Claw— 1927 

Secretary to District Agent 

—1927 
Secretary to Director of Ex- 
tension — 1926 
Agricultural Course 



GLADYS TILLMAN, 

Guthrie 

Literati Club— 1925-26 

Choral Club— 1926 

Glee Club— 1926 

Orchestra— 1926 

Education 



JAMES B. ABRAM, 

Ardmore 

Aggie -Mechanical Club 

—1925-26 

Football— 1925-26 

Spartan Club — 1925-26 

Choral Club— 1926 

Agricultural Course 



LENA BROWN, 

Atoka 

Philomathean Club— 1925-26 

Choral Club— 1925-26 

Glee Club— 1926 

Liberal Arts 

Course 



ELLIE SHARP, 

Oklahoma City 

Basketball— 1926 

Choral Club— 1926 

Educational Course 



forty-two 



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CLASS OF 1929 



forty-three 












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Sophomore Class History 



I 

8 




On Monday, September 14, 1925, a group of twenty-seven "wander lust" embarked on 
the sea of experience. As every one who looked at them could see they were just as 
green as they looked. 

After being in school a month, these "greenies" banded to-gether and organized the 
Freshman College Class. The President of the class was Harley Theodore King. Vice- 
President, Miss Lena Brown; Secretary Miss Lizzie Andrews; Treasurer, Mr. J. B. Abram; 
Critic, Miss Gladys T.llman; Sergeant-at-arms, Mr. Eldridge Roper. 

The members of the class were: Lizzie Andrews, J. B. Abram, Lena Brown, Charlotte 
Bryant, Josephine Ingram, Harley King', LeRoy Johnson, Jesse Eakers, William Johnson, 
Bishop Macklin, Kermit Anderson, Gladys Tillman, Ellie Sharp, Frank Myers, Almond 
Troupe, Eldridge Roper, James Seay, Sidney Fletcher, Lurlyn Taylor, Theodore Talbert, 
Robert Bostice. Perry Foshee, Roosevelt Gracey, William Jamts, Ralph Wallace, 
Edward Thornton and Alfred Bowie. 

It was in October that the "Upper Classmen' planned on initiating us into the Col- 
lege department of this University into which we had wandered. Our initiating began 
with that well remembered "Hell Week" and ended with the Langston-Wilberforce game. 
In every direction one looked, a green cap was to be seen. It appeared as if the green 
caps were more numerous than "bare heads." 

Being "Freshies" and having to wear "green caps" did not daunt the efforts and 
ideals of this bunch of twenty-seven. Onward we went, entering into every activity of 
the school. Charlotte Bryant, Harley King, Leroy Johnson, Jesse Eakers, Frank Myers, 
Almond Troupe, Eldridge Roper, James Seay, Theodore Talbert, and Perry Foshee were 
identified with the Aggie -Mechanical Club. Harley King, J. B. Abram, were identified 
with the Spartan Club. Lena Brown and Lurlyn Taylor were identified with the Philo- 
mathean Club. Gladys Tillman and Josephine Ingram were identified with the Literati 
Club. 

The "Freshies" entered into the oratorical contest and brought their colors to the 
"Upper Classmen," and public. Thus ended the Freshman year. 

Monday, September 13, the "Freshies," who are now "Sophomores", "Wise Fools" en- 
tered into the sacred portals of Langston University for the purpose of furthering their 
knowledge of helping struggling humanity. 

We were in school about three weeks, when, upon the absence of our English In- 
structor, we oiganized our class so as to begin the year aright. To our dismay, we lost 
some of our friends and took of new, to our pleasure. The class officers were as fol- 
lows: President, H. T. King; Vice President, J. B. Abram; Secretary, Lena Brown; Treas- 
urer, Miss Gladys Tillman; Critic, Charlotte Lenore Bryant; -Sergeant-at-arms William 
Lawson. 

This year we found that we had lost; Lizzie Andrews, Jesse Eakers, Frank Meyers, 
James Seay, Sidney Fletcher, Lurlyn Taylor, Theodore Talbert, Robert Bostic, Perry 
Foshee, William James, Edward Thornton, and Alfred Bowie. 

This same year, we found added to our number, William Lawson from Texas, and 
Gladys Pettus, who transferred from the Normal department. 

This year, these Sophomores brought themselves before the public more vividly than 
they did the year before. This year, Eldridge Roper and Leroy Johnson were identified 
with the Fraternity. Mr. Roper represented his class when he made a speech at the ini- 
tial public meeting of the Fraternity. 

Miss Charlotte Bryant represented the class when she gave the "Ode to the Flag" on 
Wednesday, November 24th in the University Auditorium. 

Miss Lena Brown represented the class by rendering vocal solos in Chapel. 

Miss Gladys Tillman represented the class by appearing on programs from time to 
time. The loving cup, which is given each and every year to the English class with the 
highest average was awarded Miss Gladys Tillman of the Sophomore Class who has 
maintained an average of 94 since entering the University. 

Thus brings to a close the sophomore year of the class of twenty-nine. 



forty-four 



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freshmen 



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JOSEPH BROWN 



ROBERT FORD 



STANLEY DRANE 



EDMOND SMITH 







AUGUSTA MORRIS 



CLARENCE COOPER 



THEODORE SUGGS 



COLBERT WILLIAMS 



forty-six 



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LATIMER GREEN 



STEPHEN MARTIN 



EUGENE JORDAN 



TIMOTHY LEWIS 







JOSEPH DOSTER 






THURMAN H. MOORE 



JAMES SHEPPARD 



BERNICE WHITTAKER 



forty-seven 



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3*2ca«ava-«ac>a*ao3-«aoa«aca*aoi ,,lfc - >**-«»* soa^Boa^aoa^aoa^aoa^aoa^aoa^yi! 



Freshman Class History 



On September 13, 1926, twenty-four crabs wandered ashore, having been 
caught in the net cast by Langston University. After many futile attempts U 

at readjustments, it was suggested that an organization be the next attempt. 
This suggestion met with approval and accordingly on October 24, the Class 
met and chose its officers : Joseph Doster, President ; T. H. Moore, Vice Presi- 
dent ; Fatrie Jenkins, Secretary; Colbert Williams, Assistant Secretary; Lati- 
mer Green, Treasurer; Robert Ford, Sergeant-at-arms. Miss Ida E. Wade was 
unanimously elected as Sponsor, and it is the inspirations gotten from this ef- 
ficient leader that effected our year's program. fi 

P 

A month passed and with it much of the feeling of being a new comer. Many 

filled with enthusiasm sought means of expression. Some entered the field 

of athletics four of whom became important cogs in L. U's. great foot-ball ma- n 

chine. They were : Joe Doster, Theodore Suggs, T. H. Moore, and Robt. Doster. 

§ 

Those artistically inclined and otherwise entered various other activities, Col- fl 

bert Williams, starring as a cartoonist, Latimer Green, as a poet, and Larney 
Webb in every thing musical. Fatrie Jenkins represented the class in Oratory. 

S 

The model table maintained in the dining room by the Freshman class was 

the cause of much comment during the year. o 

A survey made of the second term's work showed that the highest average in 
the college department was made by a member of the freshman class, Fatrie 
Jenkins. Third place in the class rank usually accorded the Sophs, was also 
held by Freshies, who had the greatest per cent of honor members in the de- 
partment. 

a 

4 

The year's activities ended with a program at Chapel hour at which time the 
privilege was granted that the Freshies may pass on into the second period 
of blissful ignorance. u 

g 



forty-eight 



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THE CLAW 



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HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS 



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1927 

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Class Roll — Class of 1930 



ERASTUS B. BYRD 



ZELLA BLACK 



RHONDA SMITH 



AUZZIE GARRETT 



ANNA MAE HITCHYE 



BENNIE E. TAYLOR 



BENNIE HAMPTON 



EMMA GRIMES 



HARDING R. JORDAN 



LILLIE M. BUFFORD 



CORDELIA E. GLADNEY 



RUBY R. HOLMES 



BUNA MANTOOTH 



RELFORD CARD 



OLA BERTRAND 



MISSIE MILLER 



fifty 



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ii . . 1927 ~ o 

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THE CLAW 



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Senior High School History 

One bright September morning in the year 1923 about 75 boys and girls from 
different parts of the state and elsewhere came as Freshmen to Langston Un- 
iversity, the great institution of learning. Each with some definite purpose 
in mind resolved to let nothing retard his educational progress. Due to the 
large number of those who had assembled to continue their educational car- 
eer, it was necessary to divide the class. In this first year class, we received 
our foundation for true citizenship and scholarship. Although we won no 
great honors this year in athletics or oratory, we did merit the name of one 
of the most promising classes in school. For nine months we solved each 
problem and mastered each circumstance that confronted us. In May with a 
clear record, bade one another good-bye with hopes of meeting again. 

After a vacation, we returned to the institution on September 15. We had to 
our misfortune lost a few of the old ones to the cares of life and to our good 
fortune with many new ones added to our number. With the same determina- 
tion, we mastered the problems of Ancient and Medevial History from which 
we learned the progress of civilization. The annalization of this subject pic- 
tured very plainly the past progress on which the present is based. This year 
the Literary Society was headed by B. E. Taylor. It was in this society that 
public appearance began. Our class was represented in the band. 

On returning to the University September 12, as Juniors, we realized that the 
time had come for us to take direct responsibilities upon ourselves. This year 
we took greater interest in athletics, social and domestic affairs, than ever be- 
fore. Tbe study of sound enabled us to be more familiar with tone and there- 
fore be represented in the various musical organizations of the campus. Our 
greatest reward this year was the winning of First Prize in the Oratorical con- 
test. It was represented in the first state Hi-Y. Valuable positions were giv- 
en members of our class in the state Hi-Y. The next greatest event in the 
school term was the Junior-Senior banquet at which the Juniors presided. 

On returning to the University September 14, as Seniors, we at once register- 
ed and prepared for the greatest of all the years' study. E. B. Byrd, was re- 
elected to serve his fourth year as President. The High School Literary Soci- 
ety was a great success this year. We wish to thank all instructors who lab- 
ored with us during these last happy four years especially President I. W. 
Young and Dean S. L. Hargrove. Whereever we go, we shall hold up the 
name of old L. U. and in triumph and disaster alike, we can sing : 

"Dear Langston, Dear Langston, Thy sons and daughters brave 

Will strive on with courage thy honored shrine to save, 

With a Sis-boom bah ! and a hip. Hurrah, 

We '11. rally to Langston, 

Dear Langston to Thee." 



fifty-two 



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— - 1927 — ,~~~~~~~~~ v »~ „ 



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S^THE CLAW 



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High School Junior 



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T/ie Junior Class 




First Row: Eddie Addison, B. M. Mathis, Sponsor; Sam Miller, Edward 
Basham, Clifford Walker. 



Second Row 
VeEsta Scott, 



Miss X. Mildred Finney, Lillian Trotter, Edna Armstrong, 



Third Row: Franeella Sanders, Esther Grimmett, Ruby Turner, Dimple 
Walker. 



Fourth Row 
Charles Stanton. 



Mildred Haynes, Vernice Powell, Rosella Scott, Viola Miller, 



fifty-four 



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1927 



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Sophomores 



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r^oa«aoa*acc*aoa«aoa*aca>«ao! v*L=AW ^ ccc ^ n<:c ^ coc ^ aon ^ non ^ con ^ i20 -j 



Sophomore High School Class 




First Row: Dovie Wilks, Oliver Brooks, Pauline Ellis, Lueile Skelton, 
Francis Morris. 

Second Row : Hattie Tolliver, Jessie Mae Sellers, Ivory Thompson, Grace 
Stephens. Lilla Mae Wallace. 



flfty-sis 



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freshmen 






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Freshman 




First Kow : Carol Jones, Fortune Johnson, A. C. Pyles. 

Second Row : Columbus Brunner Tolliver, W. D. Johnson, Dora Steven- 
son, Essie Garrison Parker, Louverta Justice. 

Third Row : Simms, Rosa Lee Hill, Zelma Hardy, Fannie Gaines. 

Fourth Row: Jewel Moses, Irene Griddle, Ora Ingram. 

Fifth Row : Earnestine Love, Beatrice Campbell, Caldonia Woodard, Alma 
Moses, Geraldine Price, Lucindia Busch, Belzora Cambell, Carrie Brownlee, 
Orsie Ola Bourland, Howard Davis, Pres. 



fifty-eight 



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Activities 






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1927 



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1 

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Organizations 






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Club emblem : Key, which unlocks the door of knowledge. 



sixty-two 



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Philomathean Club 



The Philomathean Club was organized by a group of high school 
girls who desired to band themselves together for the purpose of pro- 
moting high ideals and good fellowship. a 

Theressa \\ illiams Abram was elected the first president. With the 
promotion of this group into the college department, the club was suc- 
cessfully brought over into that field and since that time has stood out 
prominently in the affairs of Langston University. o 

8 

Officers for this year are : 

Lena E. Brown, President, £j 

Tbelma (J. Dickens, Vice President. ^ 

Myrtle Watley, Sec'y. g 

(Jladys Pettus, Treas. ^ 

8 
r i 

Colors: Gold and white. 

Sponsor: Dean S. L. Hargrove. 5 

Members: Lottie F. Busby, Anna Eggleston, Rebecca Curtis-Garrett, 
YYilla L. Green, Alma Cranberry, Laura Meaux, Bertha McKeever, 
Fatrie Jenkins, Odessa Parker, Regina Deck, Bursey Mae Sinoots, Opal- g 

ine Carter, Minette Rosters. 

U 

Alumni Members: Theressa Williams Abram, Ardesia Norman, Ethel 
Johnson, Jeneva Johmon, Valeria Allen, Helen D. Rouce, Gladys Currie, 
Cecelia Porter, Venita Jenkins-Randolph, Ella B. Todd, Beatrice Watley, 
Mary Dawson King, Janey Henry, Hilda Gard Williams, Gensie Hill 
Isles, Louise Ridley, Cleo Rogers, Samantha Anderson Hill, Levica Ev- 
ans-Johnson, Ola Mae Harris, Tommie Banner, Lois Johnson, Marian 
Moore, Alphonso Hazel-Langrum, Grace Smith, Benina Jackson, Eliza- 
betb Ross, Flora Woody, Riva Fuhr. n 



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sixty-three 



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Spartan Club 

Officers 

Norman Sharp President 

Jonathan Johnson Vice-President 

Thomas P. Scott Secretary 

William Elliott Treasurer 

John Taylor Williams Sergeant-at-arms 

E. Maurice Jones Parliamentarian 

The Spartan Club was organized on the Langston University Cam- 
pus, October 21, 1921, with R. (J. Parrish as President. During the years 
of 21-22, and 22-23, this group of young men did much to raise the Col- 
legiate standards of the institution. They were seventeen in number, a 
large per cent of whom have graduated and entered professions. 

They acquitted themselves admirably in all extra-curricular activi- 
ties. During these two years, the University quartette and the Spartan 
quartette were) supported by the same four men. At this time, the schol- 
astic requirement for admission to the club was a successfully completed 
four year high school course. 

Having served as Vice-President in 1922-1923, Booker T. Robinson 
took the reins of the club in the fall of 1923. His administration was suc- 
cessful in every detail. Among the new members of this year of whom we 
are justly proud are: F. K. Jones, T. Phurus Scott, N. Randolph Sharp, 
Charles Collins, T. R. Wharton. 

The next scene is marked with many difficulties all of which were 
surmounted by the officeis and men of the club. This year witnessed the 
most elaborate and the most enjoyable annual banquet in the history of 
the club. Constructive work of various sorts was done on the campus, 

Mr. Norman Randolph Sharp ascended from the office of Vice-Presi- 
dent to the chair which he held for two consecutive years. Some of the 
accomplishments in his reign were : laying of a walk at the east entrance 
of the main building, white washing of trees on the campus, the initiation 
of the college round table, and contributions of cash to any and all char- 
itable funds brought to the attention of the club. 

1926-1927 

Requirements for application : Enrollment in the college of the Uni- 
versity, sound mentality, physically fit, and morally capacitated. 



sixty-four 



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sixty-five 



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Hyperion Club 



Timothy Lewis ....President 

Eugene Jordan Vice-President 

Stanley 1 >rane Secretary 

Clarence Cooper Treasurer 



Members 



Clarence Cooper 
Joseph Brown 

Stephen Martin 
Edniond Smith 
Eugene Jordan 



Stanley Drane 
James Shepherd 

James B. Wilson 
Timothy Lewis 

C. Del mar Gibson 



C. B. Hutchison, Sponsor 

Motto: Deeds Not Words. 
Color: Old Rose and Purple. 



sixty-six 



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1927 



sixty-seven 



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Alcenia Holmes, Gladys Tillman, Pres., Josephine Ingram 
Solottie Sharp Amberlean Brown 



Marcella Simmons 
Ella Mae Williams 
Zeldar Miller 
Virgie Pettie 
Christine Owens 
Pesgy Brown 



Luella Harris 
Anna Faye Trice 
Ella Bee Steele 
lola Hntton 
Lelia Deane 



Literati Club 1926-1927 



Officers 

Gladys Tillman .:__ President 

Alcenia Holmes Secretary 

Josephine Ingram Treasurer 

Ella Bee Steele Vice-President 

Solottie Sharp ...Asst. Secretary 

Lelia A. Deane ...Critic 

Mrs. I. W. Young Supervisor 

Mrs. TV. Ewart Anderson Sponsor 



sixty-eight 






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Lions Club 




EDDIE ADDISON BENNIE TAYLOR WILLIAM ROSS 

AUZZIE GARRETTE RELFORD CARD ERASTUS BAXTER BYRD 

Officers 

Bennie Taylor President 

Robert Wilkerson Vice-President 

Relford Card ~ Secretary 

Erastus Baxter Byrd Treasurer 



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1927 - 

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Lioness Club 




zsoana 



Francis .Morris, Buna Mantooth, Missie Miller, Velva Porter, Myrtle Nel- 
son. 

Mildred Finney, Ruth Mathews, Viola Ford, Pauline Ellis 

Ora Ingram, Geraldine Price, Rosa Green 

Viola Miller 



seventy 



1927 o 



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THE CLAW 

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Chancelor Club 




Walclo Kennedy 

Merel Booreland, H. R. Davis, A. J. Galbreath, Albert Bolton 

W. D. Johnson, Prof. C. B. Hutchison, Sponsor, Frank Mills 

Charles Stanton, Norman Miles 

Rut her Haynes 



seventy-one 



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Utopia Club 




Mrs. G. S. Ricks, Sponsor 

Dovie Wilks, Zella Black, Ruby Holmes, Anna Hitchye, Margaret Hutch- 
ison. 

Rosella Scott, Pancella Sanders, Esther Grimmette, Ola Bertrand, Myrtle 
Walton, M. Johnson. 

Lillie Bufford, Edna Wallace, Hattie Tolliver, Edna Armstrong, Ruby 
Turner. 

Callie Armstrong, Sammy Rucker, Lucile Skelton. 



seventy-two 



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Otis Rogers 
Norman Miles 
R. L. Chapman 
Kermit Anderson 
George Hill 
William Ross 
Charles Stanton 
Albert Bolton 
Relford Card 



Robert Wilkerson 
Jesse Lucas 
Reedy Lewis 
Reuben Jones 
Laruey Webb 
Harding Jordan 
Furguson Brooks 
Bennie Taylor 
Auzzie Garrett 



Joseph Doster 
Latimer Green 
Richard Johnson 
A. J. Galbreatb 
Sherril Moore 
Thurman H. Moore 
Prof. P. M. Jones, 
Bandmaster 



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Boys' Glee Club 




Joseph Doster 
Theodore Wharton, Larney Webb, Robert Wilkerson, J. C. 
Mrs. S. Weston Hughey, Directress, Robert Doster 
Relford Card, Bennie Taylor 



Hill, 



seventy-four 



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Girls' Glee Club 




Mrs. S. Weston Hughey, Directress, Lottye Busby, Eebeeca Garrett, A. 

F. Trice, Solottie Sharp. 
Dorotha Jackson, Lena Brown, Charlotte Bryant, Minnie Williams, 

Gladys Tillman, Elweda Hut son. 
Gladys Pettus, Ora Thompson, Willa Green, Thelma Dickens 



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T. R. Wharton, J. 0. Doster, B. E. Taylor, E. A. Moore 

T. R. Wharton — a member of the College graduating class. 
J. O. Doster — a member of the freshman College class. 
B. E. Taylor — a member of the High School graduating class. 
E. A. Moore — a member of the College graduating class. 



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TTie Mozart Musical Choral Club 




Under the supervision of the Directress, Mrs. S. Weston Hughey, 
the Mozart Musical Choral Club was organized with the following per- 
sons as officers: Mr. J. N. S. Johnson, President, Miss Charlotte Lenore 
Bryant, Secretary, Mr. Theodore Wharton, Treasurer. 

By means of this organization, the music standard has been raised 
considerably. We are grateful to Mrs. Hughey for her help and co-opera- 
tion with us this past year. 



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T. R. Wharton, Lottye Busby, Rebecca Garrette, Anua P. Trice, Solottie 
Sharp, Dorotha Jackson. 

Relford Card, Lena Brown, Charlotte Bryant, Minnie Williams, Gladys 
Tillman, Elweda Hutson, Robert Doster. 

Esther Grinimett, Gladys Pettus, Ora Thompson, Willa Green, Tlielma 
Dickens, Carrie Brownlee, J. O. Doster. 

Larney Webb, Bennie Taylor, Robert Wilkerson, Julius C. Hill 



ssventy-eight 



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T/ie University Orchestra 




Prof. M. F 
Otis It oyer 
Anna Fare Trice 
Jesse Lucas 
Mildred Finney 
Harding Jordan 
Gladys Tillman 
Larney Webb 
Robert Wilkerson 



Jones, Bandmaster 
George Hill 

Callie Armstrong 
Bennie Taylor 
Cecil Cade 

Auzzie Garrett 
Adella Thomas 
Reuben Jones 
A. C. Galbreath 



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Otis Rogers 
Joseph Doster 
Larney Webb 
Harding Jordan 
Robert Wilkerson 



Prof. P. M. Jones 
Belinie Taylor 
A lizzie Garrette 
Reuben Jones 
Eddie Addison 



Miss Alma Granberry 



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Delta Gamma Alpha Fraternity 




M. L. SMITH, ROBERT DOSTER. T. H. MOORE, F. TILLMAN, J. DOSTER 
E A. MOORE, B. MACKLIN, J. C. HILL, R. JOHNSON, E. JOHNSON 
ELDRIDGE ROPER THEO. O. ROGERS 



LEWIS BRAXTON 
JOE DOSTER 
ROBERT DOSTER 
ELMO JOHNSON 



CHARTER ROLL 

LEROY JOHNSON 
BISHOP MACKLIN 
ESTY MOORE 
T. H. MOORE 
ISAAC RAIMEY 



THEO. O. ROGERS 
ELDRIDGE ROPER 
MACEO SMITH 
FORAKER TILLMAN 



UNDERGRADUATE INIATIATBS 

FERGUSON BROOKS J. C. HILT, REEDY LEWIS 

DIRECTORS 



H. M. BOND 



HONORARY INITIATES 



PROF. N R. SHARPE 




B. M. MATHIS 



PROF. T. P. SCOTT 



PROF. H. J. HENDRICKS 



PROF. B. M MATHIS 



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The Staff of '27 




Maurice Jones, Bus. Mgr.; C. L. Bryant, Sec; Whit J. Ellis, Editor in Chief; 
Ross, Cartoonist; Lena Brown, Social Editor; Colbert Williams, Cartoonist. 



William 



The staff of the 1927 Claw labored under many handicaps chiefest 
among which was that which pioneers in any field experience, the mis- 
taken value of any new project. Langston has not published a year 
book since 1922. 



eighty-two 






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Football History, 1926 

Langston 44, Western University 0. 

After two weeks' practice, the Langston University of Oklahoma 
football team opened the season at the Oklahoma state fair in Oklahoma 
City on the fair grounds. The Oklahoma eleven was not up to top shape, 
but with out much energy spent, the team marched off the field with the 
big end of the score 44-0. 

This game gave Coach Anderson the chance to correct faults which 
evidenced themselves during the game which was played on October 2, 
1920. 

The Lions made long gains through the line and around the ends, 
but lost the advantages frequently gained. 

This seemed to have been a Johnson's day who was the fullback and 
Asst. captain who made most of the touch-downs. 

Langston University 79, Santa Pe 0. 

With the defects worked over nicely from the previous game, the 
Oklahoma team mopped up the Langston home field with the Santa Fe 
eleven October 9, scoring at will, when the whistle blew the game was 
over and the scores were 79-0. 

The opponents were outplayed in every respect, they were not the 
equal of the second team. 

Jones the high point man, while the Doster Brothers, Miller, Troupe, 
Smith, "Too Tall" Williams were stars on the line. 

Langston University 13, Wiley College 0. 

This was the most thrilling game of the season, first, because one 
year previous the Texans had played a scoreless game with the Oklahoma 
eleven, the first quarter was very spectacular some times up and some 
times down was the cry of both teams, both teams were gaining. Some 
times the Wild Cats would give the Lions a scare, and the 5,000 fans who 
watched the intensely fought contest. 

A pass from Jones to "Too Tall" Williams who ran 12 yards for the 
first touchdown for the Lions gave the fans a thrill that will never be 
surpassed in footballdom. This gave the Lions the needed confidence to 
whip the Wild Cats. 

Johnson again stars for the Oklahoma eleven, Jones and Suggs were 
great factors in the back field while little Moore was a general equal to 
Washington the Great Virginian. 

But each time the Wild Cats seemed about to score the line of the 
Lions would bristle up and hold them fast. 

This game was played at the Dallas Fair Monday, October 19. 



eighty-six 






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1 

§ Langston University 12, Prairie View College 0. g 

Again the Oklahoma eleven invaded Texas this time at Prairie View 

A. & M. College, October 29, on the Prairie View field. These Texans 

Q started off with a bang hitting here and there gaining right and left. The 



g 

* these two teams clashing. 

Johnson and Anderson were stars for the back field, while "Too Tal 



Williams was getting a kick off and running 80 yards before being tack- 
led. This Avas a thrill for the fans. Jones was active as ever throwing 
passes with all accuracy. The old line never failed. 

As this was home coming day with the Oklahoma University, at 
Langston, the fans were looking for some real stuff which I am sure the 
Lions showed them. The invaders were outplayed in every department of 
the game. 

November 11, on the Langston field the Lions blanked the eleven 
from Missouri. 

Langston University 42, Topeka Institute 0. 

As the old turkey day rolled around, it found the Lions still getting 
the revenge for the two years of defeat from the team of Kansas. As the 
old turkey gobbled the last time, the Lions let the invaders lay, and to my 
surprise, it was a goose egg they layed. 

The old machine could not get into the game as it was their desire. 
The fans were again dissappointed as the game ended 42-0. 

REVIEW OF THE SEASON 
a 



■-• 



Football '20 



Langston University 44.. ..Western University 

Langston University ...79. ... Santa Fe Athletic Club 

Langston University 13.. ..Wiley College 

Langston University ...12.... Prairie View A. & M 

Langston University 45.. ..Lincoln University 

Langston University - .42....Topeka Institute 



eighty-seven 



V 



cheers from the side line of the Prairie View college students was in a 
roar. You could hear nothing but a yell for Prairie View, but as the game 
grew old, the noise gradually grew fainter and fainter until the atmos- 
phere seemed the same as after a summer rain at nightfall. The game 
ended 12-0. Tie Oklahoma team coining out victors. Anderson was su- 
g preme. fa 

Langston University 45, Lincoln University 0. l £ 

'A 



This was the second conference game. The Lions were in fine condi- 
tion. They really went in to win from the Missourians, but the fans were 
disappointed as the Lions blanked the opponents with all ease a score of 
45-0. A tremendous defeat. One that had never happened as a result of 



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THE CLAW 

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:oa~«aoa*aoa*aoa*aoa*ao; 



STATE HIGH SCHOOL CONFERENCE 



Football Schedule For 1927 



.School 
Ardmore High 
Tulsa High 
Luther High 
Open 
Open 

Muskogee High 
Okmulgee High 
McAlesrer High 



Place 
0. A. & N. U. 
Tulsa 
Lauiiston 



Muskogee 

Okmulgee 
Laniiston 



Time 

September 30 

October 7 

October 14 

October 21 

October 28 

November 4 

November 11 

November 24 



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J. DOSTER 

All Conference, Center 



WILLIAMS 
All Conference Tackle 





JOHNSON 

Al] American, Half 

Second Team 



A. TROUPE 

All American End 

Capt. Lang-ston Wonder Team, 1926 

eighty-nine 



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The Basketball Team 




Kermit Anderson 
James Morris 

Eldridge Roper 

John T. Williams 
Elmo Johnson 

R. Maurice Jones 
Leroy Johnson 

Prof. Leroy Moore, Coach 



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Baseball and Track 



Baseball 

W. E. Anderson — Coach 
J. T. Williams — Manager 
J. S. Johnson — Captain 

Of the four major sports at Langston, baseball and track occupy the 
two lesser berths. Three games of baseball were played in 1927. Stars of 
the diamond were Joe Johnson, (Cap't.) Bob Hudson, Smokty Ander- 
son and M. Jones. First game was between Langston and Oklahoma City 
and full of double plays, fast batting rallies and other characteristics of 
a good game. Score : Oklahoma City 5, Langston 9. 

The second game was between Cushing professional team and Lang- 
ston. Battery for Langston : E. Johnson and Collins, Joe Johnson. Came 
was closed until the fifth session when the visiting battery fell before the 
onslaught of Anderson, Hudson, Joe Johnson and J. Williams of Lang- 
ston. Score: Cushing 2, Langston 13. 

The last game of the season was lost to Ardmore on the 5th of May 
1927. Score: Ardmore 8, Langston 1. 

No Collegiate track team was developed. 

Joe Johnson, p, (Capt. ) ; Hudson, s. b. ; Jones, If; E. Johnson, cf; 
L. Johnson, rf; Morris, tb; J. Williams (Manager) fb; Collins, c. 

High School track team met Ardmore, Kingfisher, Rentiesville, Mc- 
Alister, Red Bird and Berwynn, on May 5th. 



THE OFFICIAL RETURNS ARE AS FOLLOWS : 



Event 



Time 



First 



Third 



Second 



100 Yard Dash 
220 Yard Dash 
440 Yard Dash 
880 Yard Da?h 
Mile Relay 
High Jump 
Broad Jump 
Pole Vault 
Mile Run 
Javelin 
Discus 

60 Yard Hurdle 
Shot Put 



11.00 Crisp, Ardmore 

23-2/5 Crisp, Ardmore 

1.08 Robinson, Ardmore 

3.03 C. Butler, McAlister 

4.01 Ardmore 

5"08" Totten. Ardmore 

19"08" Ardmore 

10" 11" Redmon, Kingfisher 

6" 01" Sykes, Kingfisher 

117" Kennedy, Langston 

130" J. King, Kingfisher 

10-2/5 Crisp, Ardmore 

42"7" Sykes, Kingfisher 



Miller, Ardmore Pugh, Ardmore 

Miller, Ardmore C. Butler, McAlester 

C. Butler, McAlister Mitchell, Ardmore 



Kingfisher 
Kennedy, Langston 
H. King, Kingfisher 
Butler, McAlester 
Miles, Langston 
Johnson, Langston 
Kennedy, Langston 
Brooks, Langston 



Langston 

L. King, Kingfisher 
L. King, Kingfisher 
L. King. Kingfisher 
West, Ardmore 
Redmon, Kingfisher 
Vance, Kingfisher 
Redmon, Kingfisher 



L. Johnston, LangstonJ. King, Kingfisher 



ninety-one 






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WOMENS ATHLETICS 



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Daisy Lollis C. T. Jones, Coach Geneva Oliatman 

Thelma South Oorine Giles 

Zeldar Miller, Rebecca Garrette, Marcena Humphrey 

Lueile Quincy, Captain 

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Womens' athletics assume a high place in the university program. 
Basketball, fencing, track, gymnastics and tennis are included. 
a 

With Mrs. C. Thomas Jones as coach and trainer the basketball team 
made its greatest showing of any year in which it was late beginning 



ninety-five 



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training. Two teams were maintained; the varsity squad composed of o 

m young women of the Junior College of Education and the Reserve squad & 

from the High School. Lucille Qumcy resigned the captaincy of the var- 
pj sity when she withdrew from school in January. Rebecca Garrett was r i 

ejected captain. Ruth Matthews served as captain of the Reserves. Play- 
ers and positions for the Varsity; Quincy, g, (Capt. ) ; Garrett, f ; Eggle- " 
stem, f; South, g; Giles, g; Jackson, jc ; Pettie, re; Ohatman, g; Miller, 
f ; Humphrey, c; Lollis, c. Four games were played, the home floor being § 
the scene of battle each time: — El Reno 12, Langston 13; Nowata 19, 
Langston 30; Guthrie 4, Langston 44; Muskogee 30, Langston 32. ii 

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The Clever Captivating Clowns team composed of 15 young women 
who are very seriously interested in physical education proved to be the 
season's unique entertainers. The costumes used were a great asset to 
their natural abilities in stunts of the gym. They presented a program 
in the University Auditorium to the very high entertainment of all who 
were so fortunate as to be present. 

The Department of Physical Education for women presented to the 
public 5 programs demonstrating the results of physical training for 
women. Each one was a very load attest to the genuine worth of Mrs. 
C. T. Jones as a teacher of all phases of physical culture. 

Most notable of the 1926-27 presentation of the aesthetic section of 
the Department of Physical Education was the May day Pete and Girls 
track meet held on May 5th, 6th, and 7th. In another section of tin's book 
will be found a full description of these events. 



ninety-six 





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M. L. Smith, Capt. 

N. R. Sharp, Capt. 

T. R. Wharton, Capt, 

T. P. Scott, Lieut. Adj. 
R. L. Hudson, Lieut, 
J. II. Spencer, M 



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SOCIETY 



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MISS LANGSTON 
Miss Odessa Parker 



one hundred one 



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MISS COLUMBIA 
Miss Eutie Roper 



one hundred two 



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MAY QUEEN 
Miss Ruth Mathews 



one hundred three 



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MOST SCHOLARLY GIRL 
Miss Faitre Jenkins 



one hundred four 



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"UNCLE SAMMY" 
Mr. Alfonso Jordan 



one hundred five 



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Soc/aZ Calendar, 1926-1927 

September 24 — Get acquainted social for students in Auditorium. 

October 9 — Social function honoring Santa Fe Athletic Football 
team of Topeka in University Gymnasium. 

October 19 — Home Economics club entertained football squad upon 
their return trip from Dallas in dining hall and Gymnasium. 

October 20 — Mrs. Young entertained members of faculty at her res- 
idence. Special guest, Miss Sadler, Y. W. C. A. secretary of Southwest 
region. 

October 30 — Hallowe'en Frolic at University Gymnasium given by 
Lions' Club. 

November 11 — Entertainment honoring Lincoln University football 
squad in University Gymnasium. 

November 25 — Thanksgiving Social in University Gymnasium hon- 
oring football squad of Kansas Vocational College of Topeka, Kansas. 

December 2 — Barn Frolic for football squad and their company by 
Mrs. Young at President's residence. 

December 11 — Pre-holiday party for members of Band and Orches- 
tra in study hall of Page Hall. Mr. Jones, director, was host. 

December 21 — Pre-holiday party for members of choral club in Uni- 
versity Gymnasium. Mrs. Hughey, directress, was hostess. 

January 8 — A social function at President's residence by President 
and Mrs. Young for faculty members honoring the newly-weds of the fac- 
ulty. Mr. Brown of the Art department and Mrs. Maud Eva Cox-Brown 
instructor of piano. 

February 3 — Mrs. Young entertained President's Bible class at res- 
idence at dinner. 

February 11 — Utopia Club entertained student body at University 
Gymnasium with a valentine party. 

February 25 — The Lions' Club had its annual mid-winter dinner for 
their special company at President's residence. 

March 5 — Spartans Club entertained their special company at a 
Matinee Spring Fete in the Study Hall of Page Hall. 

March 12 — Social in University Gymnasium for Student body and 
Alumni who attended Founder's Day Exercises. Special music by Uni- 
versity Jazz orchestra. 

March 17 — St. Patrick's Day Festival in University Gymnasium 
given by Lion's Club. 

April 22 — Aggie and Mechanical Banquet in University Gymnasium. 

April 23 — High School Junior Senior Banquet at University Gym- 
nasium. 

April 23 — Matinee Dance, by Utopia Club in Study Hall of Page 
Hall. 

April 27 — Barn Dance by Senior Normals. 

April 29 — Spartan Banquet at University Gymnasium. 

April 30 — Normal Junior-Senior Outing. 

one hundred nine 



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May Day, 1927 

Each year for a period covering three days, and to he precise the last 
three days of the first week of May ; the University finds no shadow of 
gloom, to dull the spirits and sharpen the tongues of the cheerful cast 
over it. 

There are the days when the spirit of Spring reigns supreme, when 
all of man's ingenuity and common cares fade into mists and Joy wrapt 
in her new garments soft as the breezes of Spring runs sparkling into 
the sunlight. These are the days when visitors from the state and na- 
tion throng the campus and convert it into one cosmopolition metropolis 
of glad hearts and joyful souls. Added to natures already extensive dec- 
orations the colours of the school, nation, and visiting organizations are 
displayed freely. 

A track and field meet featuring the best high school athletes of the 
state is held on these days. The University High School is also repre- 
sented by a team. No College men participated except as officials. Com- 
plete returns of these events will be found in another section of this book. 

Baseball games between the strongest teams of the state are staged 
each day. No officials elimination is effected. 

For four weeks prior to this event a group of Langston's most 
charming young ladies engaged in a contest of congenial honors of The 
Queen of May. This contest was won this year by a lovely little lady 
who hails from the city of Cushing, Oklahoma; Miss Ruth Mathews. A 
full page likeness of her will be found in society section. This however, 
will not be taken as a guide to all her charms as it does not do her justice. 

On the second day of this "grand frolic" a colorful parade consist- 
ing of the University Band, a float bearing the Queen, Ruth Mathews, 
and the Maid of Honor, Verniece Powel, followed by students of the 
Dept. of Physical Training and the students of all other departments: 
formed at the gymnasium and proceeded to the band stand where a stage 
had been built. Here amid very beautiful appropriate ceremonies the 
queen was crowned and indeed queenly grace shrouded her beautiful and 
stately form as this honor was conferred upon her. 

State contests in spelling, oratory, and music were held in connec- 
tion with the May Day Fete. Much unhearled talent was brought into 
the limelight by these contests. 



The spelling contest was won by Langston High School, 
torieal contest was Avon by Langston University High School. 

The musical contest was won by Ardmore High School. 



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Home Economics Practice cottage. (Built by 
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students 




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Mrs. Garvis Ricks, instructor. 



■ottage. 



one hundred thirteen 



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Class in Tailoring and Dry Cleaning. 



am m sss « "■> -,. „ m m m *■■ 




Class in printing. Mrs. M. Weaver, instructor. 



one hundred fourteen 



, i£»^:a*aoB»gog»saog*ac>B»ava*goB»floi 1Q9 . 

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Class in Plumbing. W. L. Johnson, instructor. 




A student harvesting his grain sorghum project. 



one hundred fifteen 



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Animal project boys harvesting their field of peanuts grown in connection with 
their swine project. They are learning to do by doing. 




Students in Vocational Agriculture 
University garden. 



bedding out Nancy Hall sweet potatoes 




in Gardening. 



one hundred sixteen 






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A student in his garden. 
As an early bird catches the worm, so an early garden 
student shown in this picture mode enough money from his 
to pay his board during the present school year. He sold a 
etables. 



catches the profit. The 
garden project last year 
total of $406.01) of veg- 




Student working on his project. 
Supervision in the period of training is fundamentally essential in the conserva- 
tion of time and energy and the use of team and tools. 




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Students constructing hotbed. 
The students in the picture are constructing a brick hotbed for the horticulture 
department. The hotbed is two feet in the ground, six feet w ; de and twenty-eight 
feet long. The students made all the calculations for the job. 



8 

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one hundred seventeen 



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Farmers learning the principles and practice of terracing. 




A student plowing his cotton project. This boy is carrying a cotton project 
connection with his animal work. He plans to purchase a flock of birds with the 
proceeds for his poultry project during his third year high school work. 



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Earning and learning. 



one hundred eighteen- 



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Vocational Agriculture student conducting dairy project. 




A sow and her litter at C. A. and N. University pigery. 







!>#§» 



Univers'ty dairy cattle on alfalfa field. This shows the value of legumes in de- 
veloping a dairy herd, especially alfalfa hay. 



one hundred nineteen 



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ica-aaoa^ca^aoa^aca^ao;? 




Class in swine judging. These boys are learning to do by doing things in a prac- 
tical way. They realize the part the swine industry plays in the development of the 
nation and are willing to do their bit, 




rreparing hogs for the market. This boy has become acquainted with many 
phases of this science and art of hog raising. He developed this animal from a 
pig to a hog weighing 400 pounds. His finishing ration consisted of corn, 70 parts; 
wheat bran, 35 p.irts: middling, 35 parts; and tankage, 15 parts. 



one hundred twenty 



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A project boy viewing his sow and choice litter of Duroc Jersey pigs. This boy's 
anima's stood second at the Muskogee State Fair and were sold for $150.00. He has 
a vision of becoming one of Oklahoma's outstanding hog raisers. 




An animal project boy preparing to ship his sow home. This boy introduced 
pure bred swine in his community and received a net profit of $150.00. 



one hundred twenty-one 



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A silo at the university dairy. This is objectively used in teaching students in 
dairying the value of succulent feeds in feeding dairy cows fo r milk production. Each 
year the students are required to fill th's silo. It serves the students by permitting 
them, to make practical, application of the knowledge gained of silos from their texts 
and instructor. - 



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A class in animal production discussing their notes made to the university for 
their project hogs with their instructor. These boys have paid their notes and the 
majority of them have realized a nice profit. They have gotten pleasure as well as in- 
formation from their work. Fanning to them is a business presenting new ideals for 
the future. 



one hundred twenty-two 



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A class in dairy cattle judging These boys are making practical application of 
the knowledge gained while in the class room. They are demonstrating the essential 
points to be considered in selecting a dairy cow. 




Vocational students, teacher trainer and teacher reconstructing a poultry house. 




Prize winners in State Fairs at Oklahoma City and Muskogee. 

one hundred twenty-three 



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StU'U'iits learning practical poultry. 
The school's poultry plant affords an excellent opportunity for students to learn 
all tlie phases of poultrylng. The student in the picture is getting practice in in- 
cubation, brooding, care and management of growing chicks, care and management of 
laying stock and supervision of the plant. 




Section of the University Brooder House. 
English White Leghorn baby chicks are enjoying the tender green pastures pro- 
vided for them in the brooder yards. 




:lk $fe 



one hundred twenty-four 



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Colony Houses 



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T/ie Division of Trades and Industries 




The Division of Trades and Industries headed by Prof. E. A. Miller has 
the distinction of being- the most efficient and the most practical in applica- 
tion of theories, of any school of the University. 

The departments are: printing-, plumbing, tailoring, auto mechanics, gen- 
eral mechanics, joinery, electricity, steam engineering, shoemaking, and me- 
chanical drawing. Each department has its instructors and no overload of 
theory is allowed. Actual carrying out of repair or constructive projects being 
the method pursued. All of the shoe repair work for the University students 
and faculty is done in the department of shoemaking at reduced rates. The 
steam and water systems of the University are kept in order and new lines 
installed, when necessary by the department of plumbing. Much of the cloth- 
ing worn by the young men of the campus and vicinity is made in the depart- 
ment of tailoring under the supervision of Mr. S. G. Code, instructor. Ladies' 
clothing is also made in this department. 



9 

tracts 






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1927 



one hundred twenty-five 



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THE CLAW 



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Department of printing, headed by Mrs. Mayme Weaver, takes care of 
all the printing of the University which does not require the use of stapling 
machines. This department prints the Voice, the official weekly newspaper of 
the University. All this work is carried on and kept up-to-the-minute by this 
department with very meager equipment. 

The department of tailoring is housed in a room of the Laundry, this 
however, is well lighted by drop lights with reflectors. Here the equipment 
is more nearly up-to-the-standard and this condition exhibits itself thoroughly 
in the work turned out there. 

Electrical courses are offered under the direct instruction of Prof. Miller 
who is familiar with all phases of this work. Wiring of the new modern dairy 
barn was done by a class in electricity. All of the repair work on the lines 
of the campus is done by classes. A few members of these classes who work 
longer than class hours are paid. 

The department of auto mechanics has proven itself equal to every task 
yet presented to it and every student of this department has learned a deep 
respect for the technical skill of the instructor. The repair of the University 
motor vehicles is done in this department. A tire repair shop and a battery 
shop is included in the equipment. 

The department of manual training with Mr. J. E. Roberts as instructor 
is very much handicapped in its constructive program by its overload of re- 
pair work. Despite this fact many pieces of beautiful and serviceable furni- 
ture is turned out in this department each year. 

AGRICULTURE 

The department of Agriculture has responded to the national movement 
in scientific farming. All of this work is done on the University's 300-acre 
farm. The greater- part of which is under cultivation. The project system is 
used and much financial aid is rendered to students who conduct these per- 
sonal businesses. Graduates from this department for the year 1927 were 
three in number, Collins, Smith and Jones. 



one hui.dred twenty-six 



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AW 1 Building Program and Extension 



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W. YOUNG, President 



Dormitory for Women $75,000.00 

Dormitory for Men |50,000.00 

Science Hall and Library $75,000.00 

Extension of Mechanical Building $15,000.00 

Farm Extension 80 acres f 9,500.00 

By legislation enacted by the eleventh legislature which adjourned 
March 19, 19L'T, appropriations were made to cover the expenses of this 
program. The General Education Board has given an additional $100,- 
000 which brings the total close to one half million dollars. 

The Oklahoma Legislature is of a superior type from the standpoint 
of Education and went on record as such when they appropriated over 
34 million for education. 



oik- hundred twenty-eight 



g»aoB*aoa»ac>a»sc>a*aoa^3oas , acc»sci 



^^sos^soa^sos^aos^oa^soanaoafcao: 



1927 



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THE CLAW 



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C. A. N. U. Alumni Association 



In former years it has been noticeable that the Alumni of the Univer- 
sity found little active connection with the school itself. For the great- 
er part they were content or ashamed to make the statement that they 
were graduates of Langston University and to ask no hand in helping to 
make a greater Langston except as individual proficiency should do so. 

Back of all this pseudo-indifference and mingled with this highboy of 
sarcasm has lived in heart of every alumnus the tradition of Modern Ed- 
ucation, strong and unfailing love for Alma Mater. 

The Alumni Association embraces more than six hundred efficient 
men and women following the professions and in business. Each lias 
proven the increased ability of those who sought ami gained higher edu- 
cation of a type. 

We have vowed that no sun shall rise and no twilight shall deepen 
but that between the two we have availed ourselves jointly and severally 
of every opportunity to make— A GREATER LANGSTON. 



one hundred twenty-nine 



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one hundred thirty 



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M 

FRED MOON, Pres. Alumni. 

a 

Graduate of C. A. N. University (1919), 
Principal of Douglass Junior High School, 
Crescent, Okla. — Member of Executive Com- 
mittee of State Teachers' Association of 
Okla_ — Member Board of Control of K. P. 
Grand Lodge, Okla. — Pres. of the Alumni 
Association of C. A. N. University — Several 
years Pres. of Y. M. C. A., Langston Uni- 
versity — Ex-President of Peoples' Forum, 
Hutchinson, Kans., — Former Deputy of the 
American Woodmen for District of Kansas 
City, Kans — Principal of School making 
highest rating in Superior Model Class of A 

Logan County. (1557 points.) 



R. E. TIPPENS 

Attended Summer School, '20, '21. '22. 

Summer Class '22, Bachelors Degree, 

Guadalupe College, Seguin, Texas. 

Post- graduate work Northwestern, Chi- 
cago. One Summer, U. S. C. Professor of 
History at Guadalupe College, three years, 
1907, 190S, 1909. Majors in Education, North 
western, and in Mathematics, Guadalupe. 
Seven years at Conroe College, Conroe, Tex- 
as. Advanced Greek and Latin. Principal of 
Junior High School up to present ttime. Five 
summers, teacher in Langston Summer 
School. 



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a 1927 q 

Jaon^saonrra^rnon^nonKsoBKSoB^noB^noi .»coE»^n*non»c»B«oi»ffl>B»co5»aoae!is 



£*non<DaD<Kon*ncc*non*noD<co52* 



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!'«^n*nos«on*nc©«con*HOB*noa*5 



c^D3a<nc©*non*ncn*Hcc*no5 



I 



MRS. E. L. PERSONS 

Summer Class. 1920. 

Summer School, 1919 and 1920. 

Summer School, 1922. 

Branch Normal at McAlester, 1915 Res- 
ident of Boley. Oklahoma, Teacher Childs- 
ville City School, 1922-1923-1924. In teach- 
ing profession for a number of years — 1907 
to 1927. 




HENRY BACKSTROM 

Graduate of Haven Institute, Meridian, 
Miss, 1893. Principal Lebanon High School, 
Lebanon, Miss., 1893 to 1907. Principal Book- 
er T. Washing-ton High School, Enid, Okla., 
for eleven years. Peace officer in city of 
Enid for six years. Graduate C. A. & N U 
1913. 




one hundred thirty-one 






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THE CLAW ^g^*^a^cra«a<o«Bco«o3gE«ao nf 

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PROF. N. J. CAESAR 

Graduated from Langston 1902; born _n 
Ennis, Texas, Ellis county. Principal Colored 
School at Shawnee 22 years. Finished at 
Emporia State Teachers College, 1915. Sec- 
retary State Teachers' Association, 1912. 
President State Teachers' Association, 1914. 
Member Summer Faculty, Langston Univer- 
sity ten consecutive summers, serving under 
Prof. J. M. Marquess and Dr. I. W. Young. 
Member of Alumn. Association many years. 
Member of General Conference A. M. E. 
Church as Lay delegate twelve years. Grand 
Secretary St. John Grand Lodge for Free 
and Accepted Masons of Oklahoma, which 
position he has held nine years. 



J. E. ROBERTS, B. S. 

Student at Langston University nine 
years, 1901 to 1910 Class of 1910. Football, 
1901, Baseball, 1902, Chorus, 1901 to 1909. 
Principal of Anadarko, 1910 and '11. Excel- 
sior School, Logan County, 1911 and '12 As- 
sistant in Math, at L. U. 1912 to '16. Prin- 
cipal at Taft, 1917. Manual Training n 
Memphis 1919 to 1925. Manual Training at 
L. U. 1925 to present date. Langston's first 
Glee Club — Graham, Saddler, Springs, Hol- 
lingswoith, Martin, Roberts. 



&oa»^a»o}a»©2apO}s»®^»^n*noa*n< 



1927 ogg ^^ i ^^ogKs^g^goa»ac>a»gcc»>aoa»jjl t 
^BoajsoaPGoa^aoa^aoaKssa^acafcEoa**; 



^a^Ec^non^BOD^noE^Eoa^ncoanos 






History of Buildings With Presidents 



PRESIDENT 

I. E. Page 

I. E. Page 

I. E. Page 

I. E. Page 

I. B. McCutheon 

R. E. Bullett 



NAME OF 


YEAR 


YEAR 


MEN OR 


BUILDING 


BEGAN 


CMPTD. 


WOMEN 


Administration 


1907 






Mechanical 


1916 






Phyllis Wheatley 


1898 




Women 


Attucks Hall 


1898 




Women 



Waterworks System 



J. 


M. 


Marquess 


Marquess Hall 


1922 


1922 


Men 


J. 


M. 


Marquess 


Gymnasium 


1922 






J. 


M. 


Marquess 


Presidents Home 


1921 


1921 




J. 


M. 


Marquess 


Addition to Phyllis 
Wheatley 


1922 


1922 


Women 


J. 


M. 


Marquess 


Laundry 


1922 


1922 




I. 


W. 


Young 


Gymnasium 




1926 




I. 


W. 


Young 


Presidents Home 




1923 




I. 


w. 


Young 


New Dairy Bain 


1926 


1927 




I. 


w. 


Young 


Demonstration Cottage 


1925 


1925 


Women 


I. 


w. 


Young 


Poultry Plant 


1925 


1925 





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one hundred thirty-three 



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THE CLAW 



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Orc T/ie Fourth of July 



(LATIMER HAMILTON GREEN) 

The sun rose steadily above the oriental horizon drenching with the gol- 
den haze, the sparkling azure "bowl" set like bauble on the mountainous 
shoulder of the "Hills of Langston" which serrated the ethereal regions like 
the swinging gardens of a Babylonian king. Each sunbeam moved stealthily 
abreast, chasing away the shades of night that had previously reigned uninter- 
ruptingly in a world of silence. Nights are nights and days are days, yet this 
day was destined one hundred fifty-one years ago to become one of national 
festivities by the mighty hand of Providence, on the never-to-be-forgotten date 
of July 4, 1776, when men's lives were estimated only in terms of daily repul- 
sion, for the more value of "equal rights to all." 

The university whistle was now flooding the vicinity with the usual schol- 
astic "howl", but this time the sound seemed more distressful, marked with 
an unusual series of abruptness, rather than the usual distribution of the rem- 
minescent notes that eliminated the chaps from facing the Dean on an inex- 
cusable charge of tardiness. This "blowing" was not accompanied with the 
" hurry-scurryness " of the students dashing for the school-door; but met with 
the response of our unfurled flag at high mast, floating on the breeze of a sum- 
mer wind. The students were lazily scattered about the campus, awaiting the 
arrival of the famous Douglas "Hi" baseball team of Ardmore. but this long- 
ing expectation was soon destroyed by their being informed that the team had 
come the previous night. 

The sun was steadily approaching the meridian and the Langstonians were 
unpleasantly feeling the effects of Old Sol's march, the ball players were trot- 
ting around panting lik > English hounds after a day of fox chasing. Every 
one was dashing under shade trees, even over-grown weeds that once were con- 
sidered obnoxious, were now cherished for their present propitration of shak- 
ing. "Are you star gazing, my lad!" chuckled a funny old man just behind a 
tall fence. "No, sir, I am looking at a ball game," replied the lad, who should 
have been four feet taller, to have been a comfortable spectator in such a po- 
sition. 

"And whozat playing?" 

' ' Langston and Ardmore. ' ' 

The game too, had now approached an athletic zenith. The teams were 
playing enthusiastically, and every play was attended with precaution, except 
where errors and hits entered in. Langston had nine men on their team as 



one hunt red thirty-four 



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active as young tigers, and eight of them were smiling, of course we all know 
why; as for the other nine they bore a caricature of grimace, so did the Rom- 
ans, when Rome was on fire. There was a continual "whiz", a "bam", and 
a score without any kind of opposing alternation; of course Langston was 
the ' ' guilty party ' '. This athletic equation was clearly unbalanced, and Lang- 
ston was not complaining at all. 

"But this is not the same team that was here before," said a spectator in 
disguised irony to one of the Ardmore bench players. 

"Yes," replied the player, "but you see it is against our custom to play 
ball before the half of the moon, consequently Ave are losing." 

Regardless, the moon waxes and wanes, but Ardmore was waning faster, 
yet main+aining a tenacity that veneered a regal pride. Of course this pride was 
as stable a« one color of a chameleon. Langston made one more attack and 
came out victorious ; Langston had eleven runs ; Ardmore had two. Both 
teairs played with much fairness. The visiting team made a dash for their 
truck, and after chering a tennis game that was in progression, they soon 
evacuated. , 

The number of visitors by this time had increased greatly; the campus 
seemed more like an attractive circus, with the many colored automobiles that 
circled the enclosure, more in efforts of display rather than through sources 
of conveyance. All at once, a big stately car whizzed by leaving for our obser- 
vation only a red streak tipped with silver border. 

"Who was that!" some one inquired. 

"That was Prof. J. W. Sanford of the Muskogee Branch Normal." 

The odor of the cooking barbecue had now permeated the atmosphere, in- 
creasing the hunger of the hundreds and playing extremely upon their fanci- 
ful imagination, but imagination would not suffice this condition. The dinner 
bell was now ringing, mitigating the extreme hunger, and many people rushed 
for the dining hall. Because of the fact that the dining hall did not have mov- 
able walls, and that two bodies could not occupy the same space at the same 
time, it was necessary to have two dinners. After the sumptuous dinner, the 
dining hall was once more "lonely". 

Many activities were now in progression; the campus presented the same 
difficulty as a three ring circus, so far as seeing every thing. The Alumni As- 
sociation was greeted heartily by our President, Dr. I. W. Young. A wonder- 
ful program was rendered. Many educators were present, such as J. D. Spen- 
cer, J. W. Sanford, S. Saddler, G. B. Kenyon, E. M. Watson, W. E. Woods and 
Mrs. L. L. Saiver. Mr. R. E. Lippens was the principle speaker. 

The wind had now begun to blow, weaving its way through the green lad- 
en trees, swaying them back and forth in accord with the ocean of bending 
grass that distributed the disturbances like naughty ripples on a peaceful sea. 



Ja one hundred thirty-five M 

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The heat that had so previously enveloped the campus now gave away to the 
onrushing wind ; everything was so peaceful, so soothing. The gay crowd of 
the campus had now set up a continual chatter; the beautiful lasses were dis- 
playing their newest apparel in an unceasing promenade, followed by the lads 
dressed in trousers that looked like skirts, bordering their tri-colored shoes : 
the older people were all engaged in meeting strangers, some talking of poli- 
tics, some talking of their craps, in energetic gestures that betrayed their pre- 
vios rusticity. The small children were gathering around the bandstand that 
stood so prominent in the midst of the campus, looking like a floating palace 
in the gay adornments of red, white and blue. Just above, on the pinnacle of 
the bandstand stood a large loudspeaker that was being adjusted to an ampli- 
fyer by Mr. H. G. Hendricks, a radio wizard, and J. D. Doster. 

The crowd had now seated themselves around the bandstand, leaving an 
enclosure for the participants of the gymnastic exercises which would be di- 
rected by Mrs. Jones, the Gymnastic teacher. The band had now struck a live- 
ly march that began the motionless feet to stir, and now then the amplified 
voice of the announcer, Mr. E. W. Anderson, intermingled with the melodious 
notes, tinging the music to an oriental air. The parade had now begun; people 
dressed from head to foot in a color of exciting red. stepping like mischievous 
spirits, keeping time with the march that was almost drowned out by the cheer- 
in" throng; then followed the people dressed in green, who formed parallel 
rows with the reds. On the south side of the bandstand were girls dressed in 
"gym" attire, and the participants of the fencing drill. One of the most beau- 
tiful performances was the formation of the "human roses", which consisted 
of actors dressed in red and green, the red representing the rose and the green 
representing the petals. Then followed the gymnastic drill and the fencing 
drill. 

The crowd had now ceased its disturbance, and was thoroughly fascinated 
by the presentation of Uncle Sam and Miss Columbia, who had begun the "air- 
plane" Avaltz. The band once mere struck a lively tune, so appropriate for 
the occasion; Uncle Sam and Miss Columbia were two graceful figures, sway- 
ing to and fro with a steady ease, like Spanish dancers in a stately tango. Af- 
ter the many elaborate performances, President 1. W. Young made his welcome. 

The sun was now slipping down the western horizon, painting the hang- 
ing clouds a scarlet hue ; the shades of night were galloping across the stillness 
of the earth, silhouetting the distant trees that encircled the Campus. The 
orchestra had now begun playing in the Gymnasium and hundreds of feet were 
shuffling across the floor. Women were dressed in their gayest attires, with 
slippers that rivaled gold in luminosity, and young men just so sleek, moved 
with the quickness of young tigers ; variously colored balloons and sparkling- 
confetti held the upper air in a continual chaos that was quite pleasant to the 
eye. As time passed on, the dancers increased; then suddenly "Home Sweet 
Home" flung from the syncopated orchestra; there was a quick shuffle, a 
dance ; then silence once more reigned supremely after so perfect a day. 

Latimer H. Green 



one hundred thirty-s'x 






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THE CLAW 



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SUMMER CLASS 



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1927 



one hundred thirty-seven 



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9 



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THE CLAW 



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:on*2on*Eoa*aoa*noa*aon<2oa«a 





LETZEISER & COMPANY 



Manufacturers of 

Class Rings 

Class Pins 

Club Pins 

Medals 



Write for Catalogue 



303 Ships Building 



Oklahoma City. Okla. 



ne hundred thirty-eight 






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8 



DDEF«e©«EKef«KS5«ra^«Kffl«£a ; «i _ .« „_ ^» w , ,«, ^oa*203*aoa-«aca*aca«aoa*aca*i2! 

THE CLAW 



r?«aoa«aoa*acs*aoa*BC©«aoa*aoi ■■■*■" -***-"-- ion^aoafaoaaaoa^aoa^aoa^aoa^jji 

I THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

8 ! 

S GUTHRIE | 

OLDEST IN OKLAHOMA 

8 9 

Houghton Department Store 

ri ""Where your Dollars have more Cents" 



S 



Dry Goods Phone 123 Grocery Phone 122 



STOCKTON'S 

H Headquarters for 

Groceries. Dry Goods, Shoes, Men's and Women's Ready-to-Wear 

M Furnishings. Notions, Etc. 

2 Highest price paid for Produce 

Phone 50 
___________ _ 

H E. H. Shaw, Proprietor 

J Complete Line of 

Fresh Meats 
J ICE 

Fish. Oysters and Vegetables in Season 

□ : ! 

fj A Full Line Famous 

JOHN DEERE, DEERING AND McCORMICK IMPLEMENTS 

World's Standard for 80 Years 

Complete Stock of Shelf and Heavy Hardware. We carry the best and most 

reliable brands. Prompt repair service for all lines of implements 

ARK4NSAS HARDWARE COMPANY 

q For the News of Coyle and Vicinity 

V Read The 

CIMARRON VALLEY CLIPPER 
Q A home institution that started with the Town 



Telephone Walnut 2935 Hours : 9 A. M. to 7 P. M. 

Dr. H. S. Palmore 



DENTIST 
316% E. Second Street Oklahoma City. Okla. 

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Chesnut Brothers Music Co. 

Pianos, Victrolas, Radios 4 

» Everything in Music — Terms 

113 S. Division St., Guthrie, Okla— 404-6 W. Main St., Okla. City, Okla. 

»i one hundred thirty-nine ."j 

I i 

8 9 

11 

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THE CLAW 



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Bank Your Money 

The spendthrift spends his hard earned kale 

And when he's sick or old and stale, 

There is no work that he can do ; 

His lot is hard and friends are few. 

Had he laid by for rainy days 

His friends would loudly sing' his praise. 

So do not be a spendthrift crank 

But take your money to the bank. 

The Cimarron Valley Bank right here in town 

Will help you save. It's safe and sound. 



Cimarron Valley Bank 



J. D. VAN HOOZER 

CHRYSLER MOTOR VEHICLES 

122-124 East Cleveland Avenue 
Guthrie, Oklahoma 



i6 You'll Like Our Service" 

Teacher, Pupil and School District 
CRAVEN OFFICE SUPPLY COMPANY 

Headquarters for Supplies 
Guthrie, Oklahoma 



one hundred forty 



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Zio^va 



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!oa*noo»coEwson»fion*cfon*non*na 



1927 



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:oa*co! 



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THE 



^». ...» !*aoa^oa<2oa*B<a*aoa*aoa-«aoa*:4 
CLAW * 

^aoa*a0a*aoa«ac>a*aaa*eoa*a0 



CThis Annual Printed bu 

Co-Operatiue Publishing Co. 



E ; S^2E r 




The Great" PRINTING and STATIONERY House 
_£/=• OKLAHOMA-? 
We occupy our. own Four-5tory Building 
with floor 5pace of 50.000 50uare feet 



Commercial Printing 
Lithographing 

Bank and Office Supplies 



book binding 
Engrauing 



Telephone 53 



Quthrie, 



Second and Harrison 



Okla 



noma 



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■ 1927 

>B»ffl5n»05a»iaon»aon»i3on»..n<jn»attn»s "^^" ' i»nnEi 



&033»o3a»^B»!ao3»0}3»0}B*aoa*BOB* 1 



one hundred forty-one 



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E*ac a^raoa^daoaaaoa^aoa^aoa^aoa*; 



rac a«aoa<Boa ; «a:>a ; «eoa^aoa«aoi 



THE CLAW 



ioa*aca*ao s*aoa*a ca*aoa*aoa«ao;j! 



Our Gratitude 



We take this method to express our sincere gratitude to those whose 
guiding hands have been instrumental in assisting us to get to this point 
in life that shall he based upon the preparation of another school year 
of strenuous labors. 

Many disappointments have conic to many of us and some disap- 
pointments have come to all of ns; discouragements have often dimmed 
the stars of our little skies but those same tireless hands have been ever 
present t<> urge ns on the highway of life and to inspire us at the very 
moment. 

Time will be found too weak to cause us to tire in our praises to 
them; mind will be found too strong to ever forget the debt of gratitude 
we owe;„our hearts will forever remain too pare to cease to love and 
adore them in life and then in the days when their bones shall have re- 
turned to rock and their flesh to dust and their blood to water with the 
ever changing sod that might chance to grow above this sacred mass. The 
power they have given will be passed on to generations yet to come until 
the service that they have given ns so freely shall become institutional. 
Again Ave thank one and all. 



^3^oaaaoa*aoa*aoa*aoa<aoa«3 

I 

8 

I 



one hundre.l forty-two 



£*aon»>non*aQB»!nKa*noE»£3oa*e< 



os»no'i 



V -——■——————■— — ■ 1927 

»^B»aoaK33E*Boa»aoa*a<a*aoa»aoa*aoi i*aoa*aoa*a< 



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Bt>B*BSa»3 



A Last Word— "THE CLAW" 



And here it is. We know darn well that every old crooked brained 
green eyed gimp will be off in some secret spot with a copy of this book 
before him counting and marking the errors in print, type, style and art. 
But to him, we mean YOU, if you do not know how to critize it and point 
out its many imperfections, maybe we can make a better job advising you 
how to do it than we did getting out this book. And here is the advise- 
just take along with you two or three — well, that maybe too heavy-take 
along just one copy of the one you got out and place them together and 
turn them page for page. I wager you, Mr. Buzzard, that you will be 
more convinced after all that there is much virtue in the old saying — 
There is so much good in the worst of us and so much bad in the best of 
us until it hardly behooves the wisest sage nor tlie dardnest fool to talk 
about "THE CLAW." 



DEAR LANGSTON. 



Words by 
SAMUEL SADLER 



Musie by 
F.J. WORK. 





CHORUS 




Lang - ston, dear Lang - ston, Thy sons and daugh - ters 
strive on with cour • age 




brave Will Their hon - ored shrine tc save. With a 




"Sis. Boom, Bahf and a "Hip, Hur - rah? With a 



"Hip, Hur - rah!" 

We ral - ly to 

"Hip, Hip, Hip, Hur . rah!" ■ '